heh my “technique” to not getting too many spoilers is having gifs and videos not load courtesy of a shitty internet connection

OMFG BEST EVER DISPROVEN

mickeymouseplant:

Don’t you love his smile? His smile lights up his already gorgeous eyes.

oh my gosh im dying

slavocracy:

A Song of Ice and Fire women & Pre-Raphaelite Art (+ associated artists): 

Joan of Arc (1865), John Everett Millais
- Night (1880-85), Edward Robert Hughes
Ophelia (1894), John William Waterhouse
Vanity (1907), Frank Cadogan Cowper
Mary Magdalene (1858-60), Frederick Sandys
The Soul of the Rose (1908), John William Waterhouse
Circe Offering the Cup to Ulysses (1891), John William Waterhouse
- Priestess of Delphi (1891), John Collier
The Beloved (1865), Dante Gabriel Rossetti
The Valykrie’s Vigil (1906), Edward Robert Hughes

potenspuella:

more pics of Helena Bonham Carter, Romola Garai, Carey Mulligan, and Anne-Marie Duff making history filming Suffragette at Wesminster

icedjellytea whispered: DELTOROSPANIORITA

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But the truly hard part was trying to find the relationship beat required because Charles and Erik haven’t seen each other in so many years and their feelings towards each other have been pent up for so long. So it was an important scene, given how emotionally invested Erik is in his friend and continues to be throughout the other films. To have that emotional resonance, it was an important one to get right. —Michael Fassbender (x)

Michael Fassbender Talks His Role In ‘DoFP’

browngirlslovefassy:

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Here are some excerpts from Michael’s interview with The Vent in which he discusses what Magneto has been up to over the last decade, getting caught in the middle of a BB gun shootout, working with Peter Dinklage and more.

Was it easy to slip back into the character of Erik Lehnsherr?

I’d say no because we’d departed from the Erik character in First Class, so now we’re sort of dealing more with the Magneto side of him. So when we pick up with him this time, he’s made that transition, and the difference from the first film is that now he’s without an army. When we meet him, he’s been in prison for many years so he’s a bit of a lone wolf in that regard.

How much did Bryan brief you on what he’d been up to in the 10 years we don’t see?

Well, essentially he’s been locked away! That’s where he’s been, in solitary confinement under the Pentagon. They have accused him of assassinating JFK, and so they’ve had him locked up ever since.

The first film was more Erik’s journey to becoming Magneto. This is more about Xavier. But how would you describe it?

It’s essentially Charles’ journey to become Professor X. In this one, we find a very broken Charles Xavier who, for lack of a better way of putting it, has lost faith in himself.  This is about how he finds that strength again and using the bridge between the past and the future that is provided by Wolverine, they set about preventing what’s happening in the future.

Hugh and others have said the First Class cast had a lot of fun between scenes. Were you trying to keep people in line?

I was in the thick of it! I remember one particular time where I felt like Ned Kelly.  Josh Helman, James and Nick (Hoult) had pinned me into my trailer in a BB gun shootout. James was trying to come in through the skylight on the roof and Nick shot me through a crack in the door – it was an excellent shot, actually, he got me right in the neck and it took the wind out of me briefly. So it was a lot of fun. We did wear protective eye wear, it should be noted, so there was safety involved, but there was scarring to the face also, so eventually the BB guns were taken away. It was a purely professional environment! Healthy exercise.

One of the new elements is Peter Dinklage as the new villain. Did you enjoy working with him?

I gelled with Peter immediately. I remember the first day on set – he’s incredible, a genius. He’s just so funny and obviously an excellent actor, but we more just felt like we were on the same wavelength. I’m just bummed that I didn’t have more scenes with him. But watching him work was a pure joy.

One particular scene found you on a plane gimbal with James, Nick and Hugh. Was that particularly challenging?

Not really, because I was bolted in there! In terms of making it look like you’re naturally standing, yes, because you’re on a belt on a pole and you’re leaning forward. But the truly hard part was trying to find the relationship beat required because Charles and Erik haven’t seen each other in so many years and their feelings towards each other have been pent up for so long. So it was an important scene, given how emotionally invested Erik is in his friend and continues to be throughout the other films. To have that emotional resonance, it was an important one to get right.

Full Interview

Vincent Van Gogh and yellow

aausten